Future Posts…and a recipe to start them off

Hello! Starting today, I am merging Adaba Foods with Julia’s Kitchen! All future posts will be made to http://juliaskitchenboulder.wordpress.com/. Please sign up for that blog to receive future email updates or just bookmark and check back! I just posted a recipe for Sprouted Buckwheat Pancakes, so get your buckwheat soaking and ready for a nice Sunday treat…yum!

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Vanilla Mint Smoothie

I want to share my new favorite smoothie, because it’s so perfectly Summer I have to get it in before Labor Day! I usually save smoothies for snacks and this is perfect for a post-hike or after school snack, but with the heat this Summer, it also worked great for me for breakfast. There is a secret ingredient too, with kind of a fun twist…instead of using questionable methods to get the green color that you find in many mint products, spinach and fresh mint each serve the dual purpose of a great nutritional boost and a brilliant green color! If you don’t have fresh mint, which I do recommend, you can put a drop or two of peppermint or spearmint oil in the water before pouring it into the blender. I keep frozen bananas in the freezer at all times in case the need for a smoothie arises. Outside of smoothie season, they are good for banana bread too.

If you are worried about the ice watering the smoothie down, no need to fret. We are essentially making our nut or seed milk and smoothie in the same step, so the ice (plus the water) serves as the liquid for the seed milk and it keeps everything nice and cold which is a critical element to keeping the bananas from getting gummy. Plus, the higher the hydration to sweet ratio the better, in my opinion, especially in a cooling mint smoothie! If you do want it a little sweeter, you can add a pitted date with the hemp seeds for an extra potassium boost!

  • 3/4 cup cold water, plus a little more depending on the consistency you want
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/3 cup hemp seeds (I sometimes use raw soaked almonds instead)
  • 4-5 ice cubes
  • 1 cup spinach, or more if you like
  • 1/2-1 cup fresh mint (depending on your level of mintophelia)
  • 1 large frozen banana, cut into smaller chunks
  • teeny pinch of salt

Pour the vanilla in the water and set aside; if you are using mint oil instead of fresh mint, add it to the water too. Put the hemp seeds, ice cubes, spinach, mint, and salt in the blender, then pour the water over it. Putting the hemp seeds in first keeps them from flying around before they are blended and sticking to the side of the blender. Blend on low to get it going, then turn to high and blend until smooth, adding small amounts of cold water if needed to allow your smoothie to process. Blend it just as long as necessary, as you want to avoid heating up the smoothie in order to keep a perfect smooth, thick consistency. I like it thick enough to eat with a spoon, but it’s good anywhere between there and milkshake consistency. Sit down, take a deep breath, be grateful, and enjoy!

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Ethiopian-Inspired Collard Greens

I feel like I’ve just had my first real day at home in a long time. Of course, that’s not really true, but it is pretty much my first day at home alone in quite a while and I feel blessed to have the clarity that comes for me when I’m home on my own, listening to my own music, hearing my own silence, cooking a leisurely meal for myself. A perfect time to use up CSA veggies* that were gifted to me by my neighbor last night. What I love about CSA shares is that, at least for the first few years, you always get something you normally don’t buy yourself, which almost always serves as the perfect reminder about diversity! Normally, I am a kale-eater. It’s my favorite all year long. But, last night I got collards which I like, but, I think deep down, associate with fatback and often overlook at the store. Today I decided that I should create a new association with collard greens, an Ethiopian dish called Ye’abesha Gomen. Since the cafe has, over time, inherited much of the contents of my home kitchen in various pinches for ingredients, I was a little light on some of the ingredients I might have used, but it turned out to be perfectly delicious!

This recipe is for one portion, but absolutely multiply it and share the wealth that collard greens offer! It takes about 20 minutes or so total, but only about 5 minutes of your time. To make a whole meal of it, add some cooked lentils and serve over a grain or plan ahead and go all out with homemade injera.

  • olive oil for cooking
  • 1 small onion, cut into thin rings (it will cook down a lot)
  • 1 teaspoon grated ginger, or more if you love ginger
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • minced chile pepper, to taste (sorry to be vague, but this really does vary – I’m a wimp and I used a few pinches of a dried New Mexico chile
  • 1/2 bunch collard greens, destemmed and washed and cut into thin ribbons.
  • 1 medium tomato, diced (can use 1 tablespoon tomato paste and 1/4 or so cup water when tomatoes aren’t in season)

Heat a medium-sized skillet to medium heat. Add the sliced onion, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Turn the heat to medium-low and cook for 7 minutes or so, or until it softens and starts to brown. Make a little space, add a bit more oil and the minced garlic and grated ginger and cook for about a minute, or until the garlic is fragrant but not brown. Add the collards and tomato, sprinkle with a bit more salt, turn the heat back up to medium or a little higher, and cook until the collards are still green but tender. Keep an eye on it to be sure there is some liquid at the bottom; when the liquid is dry, they will probably be ready. If you’d like them to be a bit softer, turn the heat back down to medium. Enjoy!

*In case you don’t know what CSA veggies are, they are vegetables from a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) share. Find a local farm and ask about whether they offer shares of their produce , picked fresh and available weekly – you pay a fee in advance and get a box of amazing produce picked at the perfect stage of yumminess and nutritional availability every week through the season. In exchange the farm gets guaranteed sales, a wonderful community to feed, and the support they need to keep their farm running when they actually need it – at planting time.

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Kaniwa and avocado salad with orange balsamic vinaigrette

I don’t have the proper keyboard to spell this ingredient correctly (missing the squiggle over the n), but it’s a new one on the supergrain scene here in America. Like most “superfoods”, it’s actually been keeping people in other parts of the world healthy for quite a long time. It’s a lot like quinoa; they are apparently cousins. It’s smaller, though very similar to red quinoa in appearance. Nutritionally, it packs the same punch as quinoa in terms of protein content and vitamins and minerals. I also read today that it’s a good source of quercetin, which might explain why I finally decided to try his new food that’s been in my pantry for quite a while. I do happen to have a little sniffle and quercetin is a natural antihistamine. So, this just might come in handy as we move I to allergy season.

Anyway, we are doing a hot kaniwa cereal at the cafe this weekend, enjoying the unique texture which I’m told is similar to grits. On the savory side, mixed with creamy avocado and the crunch of shredded carrots and cabbage, plus a little bite of red onion and topped with an orange vinaigrette, it’s really a lovely and nutritious spring salad.

I like to soak all of my grains, so I had to strain my kaniwa with a very fine mesh strainer. This recipe is written for soaked grains. However, if you choose to cook without soaking, the benefit of this over quinoa is that it does not contain the bitter saponins and therefore does not elrequire rinsing from a taste perspective.

1 cup kaniwa, soaked overnight, drained, and rinsed
1/2 cup water
1/2 teaspoon salt

1 avocado, diced
1 cup shredded cabbage
1 cup shredded carrots
1 small red onion, finely minced (another good source of quercetin, btw)

1/2 cup olive oil
1/4 cup orange juice
1-2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon coconut sugar, optional
Pinch salt

Boil the water and add salt. Add the kaniwa, cover, and reduce the heat to a simmer. Cook for about 7 minutes, stir, then remove from heat and leave covered for another 15 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Meanwhile, prepare the Avocado, vegetables, and dressing. Add cabbage, carrots, avocado, and red onion and stir to combine. Pour the dressing over the salad and stir well to combine. Taste and adjust seasonings. Enjoy!

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Cabbage Rolls

Yum. What a comfortable, deliciously grounding and seasonal dish! I just bought local cabbage from Lucky’s and, along with some Colorado mushrooms and potatoes, this is pretty good local eating for January! There are a million ways to fill cabbage rolls, so feel free to switch up the grains, beans, or anything else about this recipe. Leftovers make great stuffing too, and serving them this way will make it feel like a whole new meal!

  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 head of kale, cleaned and shredded
  • a few handfuls of mushrooms, coarsely chopped, any variety
  • 3 cups cooked brown rice
  • 2 cups cooked garbanzo beans
  • 1/2 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 8 large cabbage leaves, kept intact
  • 1 1/2 cups tomatoey vegetable broth*

*if you don’t have vegetable broth, just thin some strained tomatoes or tomato sauce with water until it’s brothy, add salt, pepper, onion powder, and garlic powder until it tastes good, and you are good to go!

Saute the onions in olive oil over medium heat until soft. Add the shallots and cook a couple more minutes, then add the garlic and cook just until fragrant. Add the shredded kale and cook until it’s just wilted. Put the rice and beans in a large bowl and pour the cooked vegetables into the rice/bean mixture. Keep the pan over medium heat, add the mushrooms, and sprinkle with salt. Cook for a few minutes without disturbing, then deglaze the pan with a bit of the broth and pour that into the rice/bean/vegetable mixture. Add the paprika, salt, and pepper and give it a taste. Adjust seasonings as necessary. Pour a little more broth into the pan and bring it to a boil. Place the cabbage leaves over the boiling broth, cover the pan, and let them steam for a few minutes until they are flexible enough to roll around your filling. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Now, place one cabbage leaf in a shallow pan, spoon about 1/8 of the filling into the middle, wrap the edges of the leaf around the filling, then flip it seam-side down. Repeat with the rest of the leaves and the remaining filling. Pour the broth over the cabbage rolls and bake for about 45 minutes, or until heated through. Enjoy!

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Veggie-ful Beans

My kids are really good eaters, but as they get older, they are out on their own more and they sometimes forget to eat vegetables! So now when they are home, whatever meal we’re eating, I try to pack it as full of as many veggies as I can. Here is a meal we had a few weeks ago after a sleepover-playdate combination involved pizza, pancakes, and very little sleep…I literally went through my fridge and put every vegetable I could find in this meal and it was super yummy!

  • 1 medium sweet potato or 3 large carrots, diced
  • 1 small onion, cut into half moons
  • 1/2 head cauliflower, cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 1/2 small head cabbage, shredded
  • 1 bunch greens, chopped
  • 2 cups cooked pinto beans
  • millet, quinoa, or rice, optional
  • 1 avocado, diced

We love roasted vegetables, so I roasted the sweet potatoes and added them later. You could do the same with carrots, but you could also stick them in the saute after the onions are caramelized, which is how I’ll write the recipe for simplicity…I also sauteed some millet cubes separately to crisp them up, but again, you always have the option to keep it even more simple!

Heat a large saute pan to just below medium, add the onions and drizzle with olive oil and salt. Give them a stir, then let them cook while you prepare your other vegetables. After about 15 minutes, add the carrots and continue to cook until both the onions and the carrots are soft and starting to brown lightly, 5-10 minutes. Clear some space in the pan and add a little more olive oil and the cauliflower. Sprinkle with salt and allow to cook undisturbed for about 5 minutes. Add the cabbage and greens and cook until they start to wilt. Add the pinto beans and cook until heated through. Season to taste and serve over grains, if desired. Top with avocado cubes sprinkled with a little salt and lime if you have it. Enjoy!

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Za’atar Hummus Pizza

I can’t stop thinking of new menu items for my cafe. I was having a conversation with my lovely baker about the possibility of doing kids’ lunches and we were brainstorming foods that might work particularly well for school lunches. You know, easy to eat, healthy, familiar enough for most kids…She mentioned that a restaurant she once worked in served a hummus pizza and I have been obsessing all of the hummus pizza possibilities since then. As you know, I’m also obsessed with Za’atar. On top of all of that, I have gotten over my longstanding aversion to olives. I think we just might have it on the menu at the cafe sometime soon…this may or may not be the version that goes into kids’ lunches, but it sure is yummy!

I make lots of varieties of focaccia, so I use leftovers for the pizza crust. You can use your favorite pizza crust, tortillas, or even pieces of bread for little personal hummus pizzas. And, of course, topping are your choice, but here’s a suggestion…

  • Pizza crust (unbaked or pre-baked will work), tortillas, or bread
  • Hummus, about 1/4 cup per serving
  • Lightly steamed broccoli
  • caramelized onions
  • pitted and halved olives (optional)
  • Sumac, fresh thyme, sesame seeds, and sea salt
  • Aleppo peppers, optional

If you are using a pre-baked crust, preheat your oven to 375 degrees. If your crust still needs to be cooked, bump it up to 400 degrees. Place your crust on a pan and spread with hummus. Arrange the broccoli, onions, and olives (if using) evenly over the hummus. Sprinkle with sumac, fresh thyme, sesame seeds, and sea salt. Add a pinch of aleppo pepper, if you wish. Bake for about 10 minutes, or until your crust is lightly browned and the hummus is heated through. Enjoy!

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